• Polski
  • English
  • AA+A++

Petrauskas Oleg lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 13 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

and

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

 

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2022

 

Author: Petrauskas Oleg

 

Title: Chernyakhov culture and the Huns (based on materials from archaeological sites in Ukraine)

 

Abstract:

The issue of the relations between the Chernyakhiv culture and the Huns is considered based on archaeological data and information from the written sources, principally the writings of Ammianus Marcellinus and Jordanes. The Huns appeared in the Black Sea region at the end of the reign Rex of the Goths Germanarich (between 369–375\376). It corresponds to the end of phase C3 in the relative chronology of eastern Europe antiquities. According to Jordanes, the Ostrogoths stayed in their places of residence after being subjugated by the Huns. This appears to be corroborated by the assemblages of finds representing the Chernyakhiv culture which correspond largely to phases D1 and D2 (about 370–450) of the European relative chronology.

The disappearance of Chernyakhiv culture can be explained only taking into account the polyethnic nature of this formation. For instance, according to the written sources, it took the better part of half a century for the Ostrogoths, one of the components of the Chernyakhiv culture, to migrate to the Roman provinces. The fate of other components of the culture can be reconstructed from archaeological sources. Some of Chernyakhiv culture artifacts (glass cups, buckles, combs, antique imports) can be dated to the end of the 4th and the first half of the 5th centuries. The ethnocultural specificity of late Chernyakhiv culture is mostly associated with the Scythian-Sarmatian and early Slavic components. The disappearance of this culture appears to be the result of a complex set of socio-economic factors.

 

Yvgeniya Yanish lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 12 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

 

and

 

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

 

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2022

 

Author: Yvgeniya Yanish

Title: Animals in the life of the inhabitants of Olbia in the Hunnic period: results of archaeozoological research

 

Abstract: Research at Olbia has been going on for over 120 years and has included a considerable amount of archaeozoological material. However, studies of animal bones from the Hunnic-period layers have started only five years ago. At the moment, 8183 animal remains have been recorded from trench R-23: 66.8% mammals, 30.6% fish, 0.4% birds, 0.1% reptiles and 2.1% molluscs. Livestock was dominated by cattle and small ruminants. Wild animals accounted for 3.0% of all identifiable remains, which is a fairly large percentage compared to earlier periods at Olbia. The diversity of wild species is also greater, now including moose, deer and beavers, for which forests—floodplain forests in the studied region—are a natural habitat. In addition, there is also a growing number of representatives of hunted steppe species like saiga and kulan. Taken together, the evidence indicates a change of climate in the territory of Olbia and the Olbian chora in the late 3rd–early 4th centuries AD that can presumably be connected with the Roman climatic optimum.

 

https://youtu.be/AMHWrmy_UYc

Krzysztof Domżalski lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 11 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

 

and

 

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

 

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2022

 

Author: Krzysztof Domżalski

Title: Red slip pottery in Hunnic time Olbia

 

Abstract:

Late Roman red slip vessels found in Olbia are a relatively numerous category of imports, which arrived by the sea to a small settlement rebuilt on the ruins of an Early Roman tradesmen town destroyed by the Goths around the end of the third quarter of the 3rd century AD. Previous research has determined that the later settlement was established more than a decade after the destruction caused by the Goths, and existed until the very end of the 4th century or the beginning of the 5th century keeping rather regular contacts with several Black Sea coastal economic centres. The paper updates the knowledge about the Late Roman red slip ware finds more than ten years after the first publication of the introductory study on the discussed category of imports in Olbia. The source materials are mainly the finds from the regular, large scale excavations in Sector R-25, conducted since 1982. The vast majority are the finds of the Pontic Red Slip ware, coming most probably from the north-eastern part of Asia Minor. These supplies were supplemented by the much more modest imports from the Northern Africa (African Red Slip ware) and eastern Aegean (Late Roman C/Phocean Red Slip ware). The paper will present a detailed typo-chronological analysis of these finds, as well as some results of new studies, especially on the Pontic Red Slip ware vessels, the last imports of which should indicate the date of the final overseas contacts of the local community, shortly before the abandonment of the Late Roman settlement.

 

 

Referat znajdziecie na YouTube, pod tym linkiem:

https://youtu.be/E_vRxHoIba0

 

Serhii Didenko lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 9 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

 

and

 

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

 

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2022

 

Author: Serhii Didenko

Title: Ceramic complex of the late Roman horizon from the R-23 sector in Olbia

 

Abstract:

The excavations in 2016–2018, 2021 in the southeastern part of the Olbia citadel (sector R-23), carried out within the Ukrainian–Polish project of the Institute of Archeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, the National Museum of Warsaw, and the Institute of Archeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences, revealed interesting contexts related to the latest antique layer of the site.

The Late Antique ceramic complex of this sector includes fragments of amphorae, red-slipped wares, wheel-thrown gray-clay pottery and handmade pottery dating from the 4th century AD and possibly later.

Four types of amphora containers were distinguished: 1) amphorae from Heraclea, types F and E according to D. Shelov’s typology; 2) Sinope amphorae type 100 according to I. Zeest; 3) Northern Pontic amphorae type Kharax, burial 33 according to A. Abramov; 4) Eastern Mediterranean amphorae of the LRA 1 Benghazi type according to J. Riley. There were also some amphorae from unidentified centers.

The red-slipped wares included Pontic Red Slip Ware (Domżalski forms 1, 2) and Pontic Red Slip Ware (Hayes forms 50, 67).

Wheel-thrown gray-clay pottery is subdivided into three classes: dining (bowls and vases), cooking (pots), and storage (large storage vessels). This category of the material has the closest parallels in the Chernyakhiv/Sântana de Mureș Culture, which was distributed on the territory of the Ukrainian Forest-steppe, the North-Western Black Sea region, Moldova, and Romania in the late Roman time.

Handmade pottery is represented by fragments of vessels typical for the Chernyakhiv culture. The fragment of the bowl made in the Germanic tradition deserves special attention.

A comprehensive analysis of the ceramic complex from the R-23 sector demonstrates close affinities with finds from Kiselov group sites of the Chernyakhiv culture in the territory of the North-Western Black Sea region.

 

Referat znajdziecie na YouTube, pod tym linkiem:

 

Iryna Sheiko lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 9 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

and

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2021

#archeologia #Olbia #Ukraina "#AlfredTwardecki #otwartanauka

Author: Iryna Sheiko

Title: Recent finds of lamps from Olbia

Abstract: Oil lamps, which are specifically shaped ceramic devices used to illuminate premises in the dark, are often used by researchers to suggest a date for other finds during the excavation of both settlement and funerary contexts. A developed typology and chronology of the lamps makes it possible on occasion to expand or, conversely, to narrow down an already existing and generally accepted chronological framework for specific ancient settlements. Thus, the more archaeological material is studied and circulated, the more likely it is that the dating of objects and sometimes settlements could change significantly.

This concerns the actual founding of Olbia Pontica as much as its decline. It should be noted that all the objects and pottery items found at the settlement were dated by the IV century AD. However, recent finds of imported ceramic lamps, from the 4th and even the beginning of the 5th centuries AD, have led to a reconsideration of the dates for the decline and ultimate fall of the settlement. It now seems that Olbia may have experienced a brief, but still a continuation after the 4th century AD. These recent lamp finds in the Olbian collection are dated from the middle of the 3rd to the beginning of the 5th centuries AD and can be referred to the latest period of the settlement existence. Most of these lamps are of imported origin, with complete parallels known from Syria, Palestine, Corinth, and the cities of the Bosporus.

The finds of late lamps in Olbia are an extremely important aspect of the study of the political and economic history of the city, prompting research into a little known period, for which there are few archaeological artifacts, and contributing new data to correlate with the overall picture of site development created by researchers so far.

 

Referat znajdziecie na YouTube, pod tym linkiem:
https://youtu.be/e82Q43wh6CE

Alisa Semenova lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 8 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

and

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2021

 

Author: Alisa Semenova

Title: Composite antler combs from Olbia

Abstract: The paper concerns one-sided composite combs that are one of the categories of bone artefacts discovered at Olbia. Seven combs of the kind, made of antler and belonging in the Late Roman period, have been found in different sectors of the site. Two types were distinguished: the first being a single-sided three-partite comb with semicircular handle and the second a three-partite unilateral comb of bell-shape with semicircular handle. Composite combs have been studied extensively from the point of view of the typology, chronology and main stages of the production process. Based on their morphological characteristics, both types of combs can be described as “barbarian” forms of three-partite combs typical of the Chernyakhov−Sântana-de-Mureş Culture sites. Similar combs were also found in the other ancient cities of the North Black Sea region (Chersonesos and Panticapaeum among others). An analysis of bone artifacts, especially finds as interesting as these “barbarian” types of antler combs, could contribute to a greater understanding of the late Roman period in this territory.

 

Piotr Jaworski lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 7 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐

 

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

and

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

presents a lecture from a scientific conference:
Olbia in Hunnic Period

organized at November 5–6, 2021

 

Author: Piotr Jaworski

Title: The final stage of coin circulation in Olbia from the perspective of the finds from trench R-23 in the so-called Roman Citadel

 

Abstract: The coin of the youngest date discovered during archaeological research conducted in recent years in the so-called Roman citadel in Olbia, within trench R-23, appears to be a debased antoninianus of Valerian I dated to 253-254 AD. Interestingly, the last bronze coins of local provenance found at the site, often fragmented, are dated even earlier, to the times of the Severan dynasty. Is this tantamount with saying that the use of coins in Olbia ended with the Goth invasions?

The answer to this question lies in a study of the latest coin finds from trench R-23, based on the interpretation of a wider archaeological context formed by the remains of the settlement and production activity in the excavated area, which is dated to the 4th and the beginning of the 5th century.

 

Maria V. Novichenkova lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed
Na kanale Archeo.TV jest już dostępny 6 referat z konferencji "Olbia in Hunnic Period", która odbyła się 5-6 listopada 2021 roku 🧐
Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences
and Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine
presents a lecture from a scientific conference: Olbia in Hunnic Period organized at November 5–6, 2021
Author: Maria V. Novichenkova
Title: Metal objects from the R-23 excavation area in Olbia Pontica (2016–2018, 2021): Classical, Roman and Chernyakhov culture periods Abstract: The previously unexplored site R-23 in the southeastern part of the Olbia citadel, excavated from 2016 within the frame of the Ukrainian–Polish project, had proved the significant scientific results from the first years of investigations. The selection of area for research located promisingly on the highest promontory in the Dnieper-Bug estuary, in the central part of the citadel, suggested that this territory could actively develop in antiquity, as a location of great strategic importance for the city. Geophysical prospection of the area has revealed the presence of large architectural structures constituting a part of planned urban development. The socio-cultural and chronological section, reflecting the peculiarities of life in this territory in different historical periods, was the study of metal items from the R-23 site. The artifacts, a high saturation of which was recorded in all of the strata investigated at this site, cover objects made of silver, bronze, iron and lead, silver and bronze coins included. They represent the main stages of urban and economic development in Olbia, focusing in particular on the Roman and Late Antique periods. During the study of the upper strata and objects of the Late Antique time, for the first time on the R-23 site on a wide area, the study of the quarter development was partially revealed and began to study - the objects of stone construction, a detached building and a semi-dugout with the remains of hearths, confidently correlated with the carriers of the Chernyakhov culture. Along with ceramics and glass items, metal objects were revealed in the layer, which are clear chronological markers fixing and confirming the existence and development of the Chernyakhov culture in Olbia in the last third of the 3rd - 4th centuries AD, highlighting the final stage of its existence, as well as the life of the settlement, which ended in the first third - first half of the 5th century AD. The Roman phase is characterized by extensive economic and building activities in this area of an Upper City associated primarily with the deployment of a part of the Roman vexillatio in this section of the Olbia citadel in the 2nd through the first half of the 3rd centuries AD. The metal artifacts from the Roman period are represented by Roman cingulum militare personal equipment, ship nails, camp and household items, including Roman provincial bronze ware, locks, medical instruments, samples of local products from the workshops of the Northern Black Sea region. The peculiarities of an area location and the finds of redeposited votive metal objects of Classical and Hellenistic attribution, residual in the Roman and Late Antique layers, are both a tentative indication of function of a cult structure in this area — the third after the Central and the recently discovered Southern temenoi — during the existence of Olbia as a polis.
Referat znajdą Państwo pod poniższym linkiem

Współpraca z Berdyansk State Pedagogical University przy badaniach w Olbii

coments closed
Nasi przyjaciele z Бердянський державний педагогічний університет (który z powodu rosyjskiej napaści na Ukrainę, przeniósł swoją działalność do Zaporoża) prowadzą rekrutację na kolejny rok studiów, chwaląc się udziałem w badaniach archeologicznych w Olbii, które w ramach naszego Instytutu prowadzi Alfred Twardecki.
Mamy nadzieję, że nasi Ukraińscy przyjaciele będą mogli realizować swoją edukacyjną i badawczą misję i że jeszcze nie raz spotkamy się na wykopaliskach w Olbii.

Więcej o badaniach w Olbii możecie przeczytać TUTAJ

„Jesteśmy z wami! – Ми з Вами!”

Roman O. Kozlenko lecture from the conference “Olbia in the Hunnic period”

coments closed

Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences

 

and

 

Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

 

presents a lecture from the conference "Olbia in the Hunnic period"

 

The lecture is posted on the ArcheoTV channel on YouTube.
You can find it here

 

Author: Roman O. Kozlenko

 

Title: Olbia and the Sarmatians

 

Abstract:

During the most recent excavations in Olbia, a number of new tamga-shaped signs were found. Tamgas usually occur on pieces of limestone, bones, ceramics etc. Some of the signs have parallels in Scythian Naples, on a “plate-encyclopedia” from Panticapaeum, in the territory of Asian Sarmatia etc. A number of tamgas are detected for the first time for this region.The excavation in the Upper City of Olbia revealed a unique archaeological complex from the third quarter of the 1st century, with a rich assortment of amphora, red-slipped ware, glass, handmade pottery and Sarmatian weaponry belonging to an elite warrior, probably an equestrian archer, present in Olbia during a time of close military and political relations between Olbia, the Sarmatians and the Roman Empire. During this period, the Sarmatian kings Farzoy and Inismey minted in Olbia gold and silver coins with their generic tamga-sign, and the Olbian ambassadors met the Sarmatian kings (IOSPE I2, 51, 54).Tamgas in Olbia can be attributed to the second half of the 1st and the 2nd centuries AD. These signs appear on objects that are usually accompanied by arrowheads, bow parts, horse bridle elements, buckles etc. Bone arrowheads and quiver hooks have parallels in the Sarmatian burials of the Volga region, which can be associated with the Sarmatian nomads coming into the Northern Black Sea region from the Volga–Don River steppes in the middle or third quarter of the 1st century AD. The data testify to a direct Sarmatian presence in the city of the Roman period.

A series of bone plaques from the Roman period, some with images of a Parthian king, come from Eastern workshops. The object they decorated could have been brought to Olbia by the Sarmatians as suggested by tamga signs with parallels in the Don River basin and Ciscaucasia, native regions of the Alans, who participated in the raids on the Parthian kingdom, and whose burials include among the grave goods products of Eastern origin, especially carved bone plaques of Parthian production, that were imported to the region.